David Rush's Blog

Mergers and Acquisitions: The Continuing Saga

As I noted in a November 2013 blog post (Is LTE the Winner? Follow the Money), the wireless carrier industry continues to be “engaged in a kind of horse race to see who would be first to offer the best, broadest, and most powerful LTE network.”

The most recent twist in the race concerns the proposed merger of T-Mobile and Sprint. As of August 6th, 2014 Sprint announced they were calling it off and long-time CEO Dan Hesse has been replaced. In the realm of LTE giants, these two companies rank well below both Verizon and AT&T with respect to numbers of subscribers. (There are other measurement criteria, which I’ll discuss in a later post.) Combined, however, the new company would have been on more equal footing—with about 100 million subscribers versus the other two companies’ 110-120 million. With less than half the subscribers of either AT&T or Verizon, Sprint and T-Mobile lag their larger competitors in LTE network build-outs and the main rationale for the merger was to gain parity with their larger competitors.

Got 4G-LTE Coverage? The Cradlepoint Suitcase Tells All

As I mentioned in my last post on 4G LTE, businesses have been adopting 4G LTE as an enterprise-grade network. One issue that should still be considered prior to rollout is coverage. Enterprises with distributed networks want to know if network access is available where their branch offices are located. It’s great that the carrier companies are aggressively building out their 4G LTE networks. But at the end of the day, is there coverage where the company needs it?

What Ever Happened to WiMax?

There was a time a couple of years ago when the winner of the race to build the best 4G network was still up for grabs. One strong contender at the time was WiMAX. Back in 2006, Sprint and Clearwire did a joint WiMAX venture, investing a significant amount of money trying to build out their WiMAX network.